Skip to content

Canyons Development Moves Ahead Road Status in CPN Remains Unchanged


by Lisa Crockett

The Alpert Corporation (Alpert), developer of The Canyons, has cleared the first major hurdle in its long journey toward build-out. The Douglas County Commissioners approved the sketch plan for the new community, which will be located east and south of Castle Pines Parkway (CPN) across I-25. The sketch plan is the first in a series of three major approval processes required by the County.

Of particular concern to residents of CPN was a concession for $432,000 paid by Alpert to the County for the “improvement” of Monarch Boulevard, Daniels Park Road and Castle Pines Parkway. The Connection has learned that this concession is a retroactive payment to the County for improvements already made to the roads in CPN.

“I can’t speak to other improvements or changes to the roads that might be made in the future, but these funds will not be used to add lanes or change the roads in any way from what they are now,” said Joe Fowler, a member of the County’s planning staff.

Alpert is now looking toward the next step in the process, preliminary platting. In this phase, the developer will be dealing with several issues, including wildlife education, fire mitigation, open space and roadway plans.

The community will be bisected by a new road, tentatively called “Canyons Parkway,” which will serve as an alternate route for Castle Rock residents in Sapphire Point and surrounding areas to reach I-25. Exact numbers for the increase in traffic are unknown, but it seems clear that this roadway will lead to increased traffic at both Happy Canyon Road and the Castle Pines Parkway interchange.

It will be quite some time before Alpert reaches the “final platting” stage of the process, which will then give the developer the ability to begin building homes.

“We estimate that people could begin moving into new homes some time in 2010,” said Mike Staheli, project manager for the development.

Avatar

CPC

Posted in

Recent Stories

Archives